Course Information
SemesterCourse Unit CodeCourse Unit TitleT+P+LCreditNumber of ECTS Credits
7SOC 405Classical Social Thought in the Muslim World3+0+035

Course Details
Language of Instruction English
Level of Course Unit Bachelor's Degree
Department / Program BA Program in Sociology
Mode of Delivery Face to Face
Type of Course Unit Compulsory
Objectives of the Course Understand and analyze the distinguishing characteristics of Islamic political thought within its historical context and be able to evaluate major dynamics of Islamic historical process and comprehend the related conceptual terminologies of political thinking in Islam
Course Content This is an introductory course on the emergence, formation and historical development of Islamic Political Thought. At first the course will be focusing on politico-historical developments in early İslamic world and how they formed a base for later conceptualizations and key terms in what modern authors now call “Islamic Political Thought.” Course will introduce certain key concepts, key figures and canons of İslamic political thinking from its start to the early modern period, including a section on Ottoman Political thought. İn addition to a general survey of legal, philosophical and ethical discourses on Islamic political thought, key concepts and figures will be studied with an emphasis on their historical contexts and with an analysis of modern discourses and variant historiographical approaches to İslamic thought on, and Muslim experiences of, state building, politics, and art of statecraft. Students will be guided to understand and analyze the thought of major Muslim political thinkers in both primary and secondary readings. First, we will try to understand significance of “‘asr-i sa’adah” and peiod of “khulafa-i-rashidun” as foundational to İslamic political thought, and then will proceed to trace the later development of the political thought within the realm of Islamic world by key Muslim figures, such as al-Farabi, al-Mawardi, al-Ghazali, Ibn Taymiyya, Nizamulmulk, Ibn Khaldun and others. As a structure, the course will discuss the İslamic political thought within main frames of juristic/theological tradition, philosophical tradition, adab tradition and historical-empirical tradition (as represented by İbn Khaldun). İn closing, the course will introduce Ottoman re-framing of Islamic political thought at the turn of the 16th century (within the context of substantial changes and transition from pre-modern-to-modern in the history of state formation). Distribution of the topics for each week is as follows: List of selected works that are used in this course in historical order: Rosenthal, E. I. J.. (1966). Political Thought in Medieval Islam (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1966); Watt, W. Montgomery. (1973, 2nd edt. 1998). The Formative Period of Islamic Thought (Oxford: One World Publications, 1998).; Hodgson, Marshall G. S.. (1974). The Venture of Islam, Volume I and II (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1974); Lambton, Ann K. S.. (1981, rpnt. 1991, dgtl. 2006). State and Government in Medieval Islam: An Introduction to the Study of Islamic Political Theory-the Jurists (New York: Oxford University Press, 1981).; Black, Anthony. (1st edtn. 2001, 2nd Extnd. edtn. 2004). The History of İslamic Political Thought: From the Prophet to the Present, 2nd ed. (Routledge. 2004); Bowering, Gerhard, ed.. (2013). The Princeton Encyclopedia of Islamic Political Thought, shortened here as PEİPT, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013); Yılmaz, Hüseyin. (2018). Caliphate Redefined: The Mystical Turn in Ottoman Political Thought, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018).
Course Methods and Techniques -
Prerequisites and co-requisities None
Course Coordinator None
Name of Lecturers Asist Prof.Dr. M. Akif Kayapınar akif.kayapinar@ihu.edu.tr
Assistants None
Work Placement(s) No

Recommended or Required Reading
Resources Fıkıh ve Siyaset, Asım Cüneyt Köksal
Attendance and Participation: 20%
Midterm exam: 30% (Details will be announced)
Final exam in the form of essay question: 40% (Details will be announced)Book review assignment: %10 (Details will be announced)
General Performance and Teacher Assessment: +5 or -5 over 100 points
Materyaller izlencede belirlendiği şekilde online olarak
Derste açıklanacak
iki sınav olacak

Course Category
Social Sciences %100

Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Activities are given in detail in the section of "Assessment Methods and Criteria" and "Workload Calculation"

Assessment Methods and Criteria
In-Term Studies Quantity Percentage
Mid-terms 1 % 30
Assignment 1 % 10
Final examination 1 % 40
Total
3
% 80

 
ECTS Allocated Based on Student Workload
Activities Quantity Duration Total Work Load
Course Duration 1 3 3
Hours for off-the-c.r.stud 2 4 8
Assignments 1 4 4
Presentation 2 4 8
Mid-terms 1 2 2
Final examination 1 2 2
Total Work Load   Number of ECTS Credits 1 27

Course Learning Outcomes: Upon the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
NoLearning Outcomes
1 Understand essential characteristics of political thinking in İslam
2 See the theorizing process in İslam in the face of the challenges of historical realities
3 Identify crucial turning points in history and in political thought during the first ten to eleven centuries of Islamic era
4 Explain the relationship between theory and practice in political experiences of Islamic civilization
5 Distinguish alternative ways of approaching politics by jurists, philosophers, political scientists, and carriers and shapers of adab traditions


Weekly Detailed Course Contents
WeekTopicsStudy MaterialsMaterials
1 1st Week: Introduction: -A survey of the course topics -General overview of the literature on İslamic political thought-I *Syllabus One asterix * is used for required readings Two asterix ** are used for suggested extra readings *A brief survey of ideas on İslamic Political Thought: -Nicholas Tampo, “İslamic Political Thought,” in The Encyclopedia of Political Thought (John Wiley & Sons, 2015), (DOI: 10.1002/9781118474396.wbept0542); *Gerhard Bowering, “İntroduction” in PEİPT, p. Vİİ-XİV; **For a different (essentializing) approach to İslamic state and society: Bernard Lewis, “State and Society under İslam,” Wilson Quarterly, 13/4 (1989), p. 39-53. Yüklenecek
2 2nd Week: General overview of İslamic political thought-II, (continue with discussion of some key terms) *What does “İslamic” mean in İslamic Political Thought, and issue of treatment of Muslim societies as a uniform analytical unit: Marshall G. S. Hodgson, “Islamdon, Islamicate” and “The Islamic Vision in Religion and Civilization” in The Venture of Islam, Volume 1 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1974), 57-60; 71-99; *Concerning the concept of “İmam” and related words such as “imamate”, “emiru’l-mu’minin”, “khalifah” etc.; concept of “bay’ah” (oath of allegiance” and “hakimiyye” or ‘state’ authority: In Gerhard Bowering edt. Princeton Encyclopedia of İslamic Political Thought, (Princeton University Press), for “İmamate” pages 247-250; for “bay’ah” read “oath of allegiance,” page: 401; for “hakimiyye” read “authority” pages: 50-56 Yüklenecek
3 3rd Week: The Formative Period of Islamic Political Thought I *Fred Donner, “Muhammed and İslamic State” The Early İslamic conquest p. 51-90; *Wilferd Madelung, The Succession to Muhammad: A Study of the Early Caliphate (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997), 1-56; *Marshall G. S. Hodgson, “The Early Muslim State” and “The Absolutism in Flower” in The Venture of Islam, Volume 1 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1974), 187-230; 280-314.; *İra Lapidus, “State and Religion in İslamic Societies”, Past & Present, No. 151 (May, 1996), p. 3-27; *-Patricia Crone, Pre-İndustrial Societies, (Oxford: Blackwell Publ. 1994), p. 1-81; -Tayeb El-Hibri, “introduction” Parable and Politics in Early İslamic History, p. 1-25; Chapter 7; “From caliphate to Kingship: Umar’s Reign and Future of Changes” p.262-299.; **W. Montgomery Watt: “Part One: The Beginnings” and “Part Two: The Century of Struggle (750-850) in The Formative Period of Islamic Thought (Oxford: One World Publications, 1998), 9-250 Yüklenecek
4 4th Week: The Formative Period of Islamic Political Thought II: Epistemological Base *Syed Muhammad Naquib al-Attas, “Introduction” and “Islam: The Concept of Religion and the Foundation of Ethics and Morality” in The Prolegomena to the Metaphysics of Islam: An Exposition of the Fundamental Elements of the Worldview of Islam (Kuala Lumpur: ISTAC, 1995), 1-89. *Ahmet Davutoğlu, “Islamic Paradigm: Tawhid and Ontological Differentiation” in Alternative Paradigms: The Impact of Islamic and Western Weltanschauungs on Political Theory (Maryland: University Press of America, 1994), 47-86.; *For a western and Eurocentric reading of the base for İslamic political thought: -Antony Black, “Knowledge and Power: Philosophy without the Polis” and “The Theory of the Caliphate,” in The History of İslamic Political Thought: From the Prophet to the Present, (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011), p. 57-90; **For a survey: W. Montgomery Whatt, “Part Three: The Triumph of Sunnism (850-945)” in The Formative Period of Islamic Thought (Oxford: One World Publications, 1998), 253-318. Yüklenecek
5 5th Week: The “Constitutional” (Juristic/Theological) Tradition and The Law *Marshall G. S. Hodgson, “The Shar’i Islamic Vision” in The Venture of Islam, Volume 1 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1974), 315-358. Suggested: **For a survey of idea of “Islamic state”: *Muhammad Qasım Zaman, “The Caliphs, the Ulama, and the Law: Defining the Role and Function of the Caliph in Early Abbasid Period,” İslamic Law and Society 4/1 (1997), p. *Sherman A. Jackson, “Defining the Legal Jurisdiction of the State” in İslamic Law and the State: The Constitutional Jurisprudence of Shiab al-Din al-Qarafi, (London: Brill, 1996) Chapter 6, page: 185-210. **-Asma Asfaruddin, “The “İslamic State”: Geneology, Facts, and Mhyts,” Journal of Church and State, 48/1 (2006), p. 153-173; For broader view of law and its highest goal: -M. Hashim Kamali, “Law and Society: The Interplay of Revelation and Reason in the Shariah,” The Oxford History of Islam (Oxford UP:1999), 107-153 Yüklenecek
6 6th Week: The authoritative figures within a frame of “constitutionalism”-I: Al-Mawardi (974-1058) *Andrew F. March, “constitutionalism” in PEİPT, p. 112-115; *Mehmetcan Akpınar, “Mawardi,” in PEİPT, p. 331-332; *Ann K. S. Lambton, “Al-Mawardi: Wizâra and Imâra” in State and Government in Medieval Islam: An Introduction to the Study of Islamic Political Theory-the Jurists (New York: Oxford University Press, 1981), 83-102.; *M. Qamaruddin Khan, “Al-Mawardi” in A History of Muslim Philosophy, ed. M. M. Sharif (Wiesbaden: Otto Harrossowitz, 1966), Chapter XXXVI, 717-731; **Hamilton A. R. Gibb, “Some Considerations on the Sunni Theory of the Caliphate” and “Al-Mawardi’s Theory of the Caliphate” in Studies on the Civilization of Islam, eds. Stanford J. Shaw and William R. Polk (New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1982), 141-165. Yüklenecek
7 7th Week: The authoritative figures within a frame of “constitutionalism”-I: Al-Juwayni (1028-1085) and Al-Ghazali (1058-1111). *Ann K. S. Lambton, “Al-Juwayni and al-Ghazali: The Sultanate” in State and Government in Medieval Islam: An Introduction to the Study of Islamic Political Theory-the Jurists (New York: Oxford University Press, 1981), 103-129.; *Carole Hillenbrand, “Islamic Orthodoxy or Realpolitik? Al-Ghazali’s Views on Government”, Journal of Persian Studies, Vol.26 (1988): 81-94.; *Leonard Binder, “Al-Ghazali’s Theory of Islamic Governmnet”, The Muslim World, Vol.XIV (1955): 228-241.; *Erwin Rosenthal, “Al-Ghazali” in Political Thought in Medieval Islam (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1958), 38-43.; **For a different western perceptive:; -Antony Black, “Al-Ghazali: Mysticism and Politics,” in The History of İslamic Political Thought: From the Prophet to the Present, (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011), p. 97-110 Yüklenecek
8 8th Week: Midterm Exam Week Prep for exam. Genel değerlendirme ve hazırlık
9 9th Week: The authoritative figures within a frame of “constitutionalism”-III: Ibn Jamâ’a (1241-1333) and Ibn Taymiyya (1263-1328) *Ann K. S. Lambton, “The Extinction of the Caliphate: Ibn Jamâ’a and Ibn Taymiyya” in State and Government in Medieval Islam: An Introduction to the Study of Islamic Political Theory-the Jurists (New York: Oxford University Press, 1981), 138-151.; *Banan Malkawi and Tamara Sonn, “Ibn Taymiyya on Islamic Governance” in Islam, the State, and Political Authority: Medieval Issues and Modern Concerns, ed. Asma Afsaruddin (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), 111-127.; *Qamaruddin Khan, The Political Thought of Ibn Taymiyah (Islamabad: Islamic Research Institute, 1985), 98-170. Yüklenecek
10 10th Week: The authoritative figures within the frame of Philosophical Tradition: Al-Farabi (872-950), Ibn Sina (980-1037) and Ibn Rushd (1126-1198) *Marshall G. S. Hodgson, “Speculation: Falsafah and Kalam” in The Venture of Islam, Volume 1 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1974), 410-443.; *Erwin Rosenthal, “Al-Farabi: The Foundation” and “Ibn Rushd: The Consummation”in Political Thought in Medieval Islam (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1958), 122-142; 175-209.; *Massimo Campanini, “Alfarabi and the Foundation of Political Theology in Islam” in Islam, the State, and Political Authority: Medieval Issues and Modern Concerns, ed. Asma Afsaruddin (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), 35-52.; *Charles E. Butterworth, “Alfarabi’s Goal: Political Philosophy, Not Political Theology” in Islam, the State, and Political Authority: Medieval Issues and Modern Concerns, ed. Asma Afsaruddin (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), 53-74 Yüklenecek
11 11th Week: The authoritative figures within the frame of the Philosophical/Ethical Tradition: Ibn Miskawayh (932-1030) and Al-Tusi (1201-1274) *Majid Fakhry, Ethical Theories in Islam (Leiden: Brill, 1994), 107-142.; *Abdurrahman Badawi, “Miskawayh” in A History of Muslim Philosophy, ed. M. M. Sharif (Wiesbaden: Otto Harrossowitz, 1966), 469-479.; *Bakhtiyar Hussain Siddiqi, “Nasir al-Din Tusi” in A History of Muslim Philosophy, ed. M. M. Sharif (Wiesbaden: Otto Harrossowitz, 1966), 564-580. Yüklenecek
12 12th Week: The authoritative figures within the frame of the Adab Tradition: Ibn al-Muqaffa (724-759) and Nizam al-Mulk (1018-1092) *Marshall G. S. Hodgson, “Adab: The Bloom of Arabic Literary Culture” in The Venture of Islam, Volume 1 (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1974), 444-472. *Erwin Rosenthal, “The Views of Princes, Prime Ministers and Men of Letters” in Political Thought in Medieval Islam (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1958), 67-83. Yüklenecek
13 13th Week: The authoritative figures within the frame of the The Empirical Tradition: Ibn Khaldun (1332-1406) *Ibn Khaldun, The Muqaddimah, translated by F. Rosenthal (New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1980), I, 6-14, 55-68, 71-85, 249-310, 313-402; *Erwin Rosenthal, “The Theory of the Power-State: Ibn Khaldun’s Study of Civilization” in Political Thought in Medieval Islam (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1958), 122-142.; *Muhammad M. Rabi’, The Political Theory of Ibn Khaldun (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1967).; *Ibn Khaldun, The Muqaddimah, II, 413-448, 89-156 Yüklenecek
14 14th Week: İslamic political thought re-framed under the Ottoman historical experience * -Hu¨seyin Yılmaz, İntroduction” in Caliphate Redefined: the Mystical turn in Ottoman Political Thought, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018), p. 1-21; * -Ariel Salzmann, “İntroduction: Tocqueville’s Ghost,” in Tocqueville in the Ottoman Empire: Rival Paths to the Modern State, (Leiden: Brill, 2004), p. 1-30 (For an overall historical analysis of Ottoman state and society as pre-modern socio-political formation).; * -Marinos Sariyannis, “Introduction” in A History Of Ottoman Political Thought up to the Early Nineteenth Century, (Leiden: Brill, 2019), p.1-22 ; *-Özgür Kavak, Review of A History Of Ottoman Political Thought up to the Early Nineteenth Century, (Leiden: Brill, 2019), in İlahiyat Studies, 10/2 (Summer/Fall 2019), p. 267-274.; ** Rifa’at Ali Abou-El-Haj, “Fitnah, Huruc ala al-Sultan and Naihat: Political Struggle and Social Conflict in Ottoman Society-1560’s-1700’s in Varia, Turcica, 4 (1987), p. 185-191 Yüklenecek


Contribution of Learning Outcomes to Programme Outcomes
P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7 P8 P9 P10 P11 P12 P13
All 1
C1 1 1
C2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
C3
C4
C5

Contribution: 1: Very Slight 2:Slight 3:Moderate 4:Significant 5:Very Significant


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