Course Information
SemesterCourse Unit CodeCourse Unit TitleT+P+LCreditNumber of ECTS Credits
7SOC 403Khaldunian Sociology3+0+035

Course Details
Language of Instruction English
Level of Course Unit Bachelor's Degree
Department / Program BA Program in Sociology
Mode of Delivery Face to Face
Type of Course Unit Compulsory
Objectives of the Course The course introduces the students to the historical sociology of Ibn Haldun by reading his Muqaddimah. The aim of the course is to allow students to use the knowledge they acquired in sociological approaches and concepts based on modern social theories and relate them to other schools of thought and explore their relevance in understanding the human condition. The reading of sections of Muqaddimah will highlight ideas related to themes like civility, the tribe, religion, formation of the state and the dynamics of power, as well as urban sociology.
Developing a strong historical/sociological imagination will be the journey of this course. It is interdisciplinary by structure and is focused on applying Ibn Haldun to modern issues. Not only the benefit of reading the Muqaddimah is introduced but also understanding its limitations. Critical thinking is central in assessing historical texts too.


Course Content 1-Introducing in a comprehensive manner the ideas of Ibn Haldun to class.
2-Enabling students to imagine social phenomena in its complexity across space and time.
3-Exploring the impact of history on social phenomena.
4-Teaching students critical thinking and critical analysis of contemporary sociological debates.
5-Relate the ideas of Ibn Haldun to student’s own experience, narrative, memories and observations on the topics discussed, and building on students’ own cultural diversity.
6-Develop the students’ futuristic imagination through bridging the space between the historical, the contemporary and nd the futuristic
Course Methods and Techniques Conceptual analysis and historical sociology are used to analyze the history of thought and the development of the ideas of each thinker
Prerequisites and co-requisities None
Course Coordinator None
Name of Lecturers Asist Prof.Dr. Heba Ezzat heba.raouf2@gmail.com
Assistants None
Work Placement(s) No

Recommended or Required Reading
Resources canvas
1-The students would be able after completing the course to introduce the dimensions of history and culture to their other research and analysis.
2-Students would have acquired the skill to read classic Islamic thought texts.
3-Students would be able to compare civilizations and see the manifestations of concepts in different geographical contexts.
4-Students would be able to explore and investigate future developments of globalization in terms of their own conceptual capital, i.e. neo-tribalism, nomadism, new forms of urbanity and civility etc., and know how to re-visit classic concepts in new contexts.
5-Students will have the skill to see continuity, change and rebirth of diverse social phenomena.

Canvas
Canvas
Canvas

Course Category
Social Sciences %100

Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Activities are given in detail in the section of "Assessment Methods and Criteria" and "Workload Calculation"

Assessment Methods and Criteria
In-Term Studies Quantity Percentage
Mid-terms 1 % 15
Assignment 14 % 30
Attendance 14 % 10
Project 1 % 25
Final examination 1 % 20
Total
31
% 100

 
ECTS Allocated Based on Student Workload
Activities Quantity Duration Total Work Load
Course Duration 14 3 42
Assignments 14 4 56
Presentation 3 2 6
Mid-terms 1 3 3
Project 1 40 40
Final examination 1 3 3
Total Work Load   Number of ECTS Credits 5 150

Course Learning Outcomes: Upon the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
NoLearning Outcomes
1 The students would be able after completing the course to introduce the dimensions of history and culture to their other research and analysis.
2 Students would have acquired the skill to read classic Islamic thought texts.
3 Students would be able to compare civilizations and see the manifestations of concepts in different geographical contexts.
4 Students would be able to explore and investigate future developments of globalization in terms of their own conceptual capital, i.e. neo-tribalism, nomadism, new forms of urbanity and civility etc., and know how to re-visit classic concepts in new contexts.
5 Students will have the skill to see continuity, change and rebirth of diverse social phenomena.


Weekly Detailed Course Contents
WeekTopicsStudy MaterialsMaterials
1 Introduction to why we need to study Ibn Khaldun, and mapping of what the main questions of social sciences are. Getting introduced to students and discussing their background and expectations. Sketching the content of an introductory reading. - Reading the Invocation and Foreword of Muqaddimah. -Syed Farid Alatas, Ibn Khaldun (Makers of Islamic Civilization), Oxford: OUP, 2013, pp.1-14.
2 Why study historical sociology and how it forms our sociological imagination Ibn Khaldun’s Muqadimmah pp. 55-89. -Fernand Braudel, On History, Translated by Sarah Matthews, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980, pp.26-54. Additional Reading:
3 The link between historical sociology and geography: imagining the trajectories and configurations Mapping Ibn Khaldun’s introductions on geography, earth, climate and culture from Muqaddimah. -C.Wright Mills, The Sociological Imagination, Oxford: OUP, 2000, pp.3-24. -Stephen Daniels, Geographical imagination, Transactions (of the Institute of British Geographers), New Series, Vol. 36, No. 2(April 2011), pp. 182-187.
4 What are the major forces behind rise of dynasties, formation of states and power relations Mehdi Muhsin, Ibn Khaldun’s Philosophy of History: A Study in the Philosophical Foundation of the Science of Culture, London: George Allen and Unwin, 1957, pp.133-170. Reading Muqaddimah Chapter 2
5 What is civility (tamaddun). Is it manners and civic virtues or a social contract or culture? -Mehdi Muhsin, Ibn Khaldun’s : Philosophy of History: A Study in the Philosophical Foundation of the Science of Culture, London: George Allen and Unwin, 1957, pp.171-224. -Britta Baumgarten, Dieter Gosewinkel and Dieter Rucht, 'Civility: introductory notes on the history and systematic analysis of a concept', European Review of History: Revue europeenne d'histoire, 18: 3, (2011), 289 — 312. -Muqaddimah ch 3
6 What is a tribe and why do tribes matter -Daniel P. Biebuyck, “On the Concept of Tribe”, Civilisations, Vol. 16, No. 4 (1966), pp. 500-515 . -Robin Fox, The Tribal Imagination: Civilization and the Savage Mind, Harvard University Press, 2011, pp.1-82. -Peter Metcalf, Anthropology: the basics. Taylor & Francis,2005, (Ch 8).
7 How does the tribal change over time. Is Ibn Haldun useful today to understand social bonds and social clustering? Mehdi Muhsin, Ibn Khaldun’s : Philosophy of History: A Study in the Philosophical Foundation of the Science of Culture, London: George Allen and Unwin, 1957, pp. 225-284. - Michel Maffesoli, Time of the Tribe: The decline of Individualism in Mass Society, London: Sage, 1996, x-xii, 1-30.
8 - Kevin Hetherington, Expressions of Identity: Space, Performance, Politics (Published in association with Theory, Culture & Society), London: Sage, 1998,pp.41-60. -Anthony D'Andrea, “Deciphering the Space and Scale of Global Nomadism Subjectivity and Counterculture in a Global Age”, in: Saskia Sassen (Ed.). Deciphering the Global: Its Scales, Spaces and Subjects. London; Routledge, 2007, pp.139-150.
9 How did the tribe survive modernity -Syed Farid Alatas, Applying Ibn Khaldun: The Recovery of a Lost Tradition in Sociology, N.Y.: Routledge, 2014, pp.25-42,143-155. -Philip Khoury and Joseph Kostiner (eds.), Tribes and State Formation in the Middle East, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990,pp.1-47,109-126,303-312. -Charles Tilly, War Making and State Making as organized Crime,in: Peter Evans, Dietrich Rueschemeyer, and Theda Skocpol (eds), Bringing the State Back In, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985, 169–191.
10 -Hazem Ziada, Preliminary Notes on Islamic Political Space: Madina In Quranic Discourse, Journal of Islamic Architecture ,Volume 1, Issue 4, December 2011, pp.199-209. -Janet L. Abu-Lughod, “ The Islamic City-Historic Myth, Islamic Essence, and Contemporary Relevance” in: International Journal of Middle East Studies, Vol. 19, No. 2 (May 1987), pp. 155-176. Muqaddimah . Chapter 4.
11 -Engin Isin, “Historical Sociology of the City”, in: Gerard Delanty (ed.), Handbook of Historical Sociology, London: Sage 2003, pp.312-324. -Nezar Alsayyad, & Ananya Roy, Medieval modernity: on citizenship and Urbanism in a Global Era. Space & Polity, 10(1), (2006)1-20. Muqaddimah Ch 4
12 - Dhaouadi, “The Concept of Change in the Thought of Ibn Khaldun and Western Classical Sociologists,” Ara?tyrmalary Dergisi, Sayy 16, Istanbul:YSAM, 2006, 43-87.
13 -Reading Ibn Khaldun on religion in Al Muqaddimah. -Tala Asad, "The Construction of Religion as an Anthropological Category," in : Talal Asad, Genealogies of Religion: Discipline and Reasons of Power in Christianit) and slam (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press,1982)), pp. 27-54. -Recep Şentürk and Ali M. Nizamuddin , “The Sociology of Civilisations: Ibn Khaldun and a Multi-Civilisational World Order”,Asian Journal of Social Science, Vol. 36, No. 3/4, (2008), pp. 516-546.
14 Robert Irwin, Ibn Haldun: An Intellectual Biography, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2018,pp162-203


Contribution of Learning Outcomes to Programme Outcomes
P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7 P8 P9 P10 P11 P12 P13
C1 5
C2 4
C3 4
C4 3
C5 3

Contribution: 1: Very Slight 2:Slight 3:Moderate 4:Significant 5:Very Significant


https://obs.ihu.edu.tr/oibs/bologna/progCourseDetails.aspx?curCourse=210461&lang=en