Course Information
SemesterCourse Unit CodeCourse Unit TitleT+P+LCreditNumber of ECTS Credits
2ANTH 101Social-Cultural Anthropology3+0+035

Course Details
Language of Instruction English
Level of Course Unit Bachelor's Degree
Department / Program BA Program in Sociology
Mode of Delivery Face to Face
Type of Course Unit Compulsory
Objectives of the Course This course provides an introduction to some of the central conceptual and methodological discussions in social-cultural anthropology.
Course Content Beside a historical understanding about the discipline, through ethnographic examples, this course explores key themes in social-cultural anthropology like culture, race, ethnicity, gender and religion, and their intertwined relationship in order to understand the social differences in society, heterogeneity of social structure and the structures of social relationships and belief systems that operate in different cultural settings. With this outlook, the aim of the course is to offer an understanding of what an anthropological perspective on our experiences is and how it would help us to develop a critical engagement with the world we live in. This course would provide students to understand the tremendous variety of human experiences (cultural, ethnic, racial, gendered, class, religious), and their relationship to social, political, economic, and historical contexts. Thus, the students would develop the ability to guide people by taking into account the cultural diversity, contextual differences in experiences and power relations.
Course Methods and Techniques
Prerequisites and co-requisities None
Course Coordinator Prof.Dr. IRFAN AHMAD
Name of Lecturers Prof.Dr. IRFAN AHMAD
Assistants None
Work Placement(s) No

Recommended or Required Reading
Resources There are, speaking metaphorically, innumerable textbooks on social-cultural anthropology. Along with diverse other materials such as journal articles, chapters, sourcebooks, essays, films and documentaries, two of them this course often utilizes are: Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity by Conrad Phillip Kottak (16th edition published by McGraw Hill, New York, 2015) and Small Places, Large Issues: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology by Thomas Eriksen (revised 4th edition published by Pluto Press, London, 2015). All materials used in this course are listed under “Readings” in the 11th title of this coursebook. There is no single book that covers the content, approach and range of this course.
Subject to their respective interests, students are encouraged to consult other resources on their own (see title 13 at the end in the coursebook).
1. Attendance, Participation and Discussion hours: 20 % 2. 2 Response/Analysis Papers: 20 % 3. Research Proposal, Ethnographic Fieldwork Paper and Presentation: 30 %
5. Final Exam: 30 %

Course Category
Social Sciences %80
Education %10
Science %5
Health %5

Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Activities are given in detail in the section of "Assessment Methods and Criteria" and "Workload Calculation"

Assessment Methods and Criteria
In-Term Studies Quantity Percentage
Mid-terms 1 % 20
Assignment 2 % 20
Attendance 1 % 10
Project 3 % 30
Final examination 1 % 20
Total
8
% 100

 
ECTS Allocated Based on Student Workload
Activities Quantity Duration Total Work Load
Course Duration 14 3 42
Hours for off-the-c.r.stud 14 2 28
Assignments 2 8 16
Presentation 1 24 24
Mid-terms 1 15 15
Project 1 24 24
Final examination 1 48 48
Total Work Load   Number of ECTS Credits 7 197

Course Learning Outcomes: Upon the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
NoLearning Outcomes
1 1. Understand the methodological and conceptual discussions on social-cultural anthropology and use them to understand the society and human relationships
2 2. Demonstrate how we might think anthropologically about culture, gender, social class, religion and reflect this epistemological approach to develop their perspective in counseling psychology and education
3 3. Explain main theoretical and methodological problems emerging in anthropology so that in any other discipline intervening people’s life
4 4. Interrelate their personal and everyday practices and experiences with the methods of social-cultural anthropology
5 5. Be aware of the structural inequality, discrimination, racism and exclusion in society and prevent to consent the reproduction of these structures


Weekly Detailed Course Contents
WeekTopicsStudy MaterialsMaterials
1 Introduction of the Class & to the Course; Rules and the Plan Bohannan, Laura. 1966. “Shakespeare in the Bush.” Natural History. August-September. 9 Pages. Ahmad, Irfan. 2015. “Talal Asad Interviewed by Irfan Ahmad.” Public Culture. 27(2): 259 – 279.
2 What is Anthropology? Its History, Aim and Distinction Connolly, Bob and Robin Anderson. 1983. Film: First Contact (58 minutes). Watch here. Ahmad, Irfan. 2018. “ On the Absence of the Political in Four-Field Anthropology.” Anthropology News. 22 March. 3 Pages. Kottak, Conrad Phillip. 2015. “What is Anthropology?” In Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity (16th edition). New York: McGraw Hill: 1-19. Eriksen, Thomas. 2015. “A Brief History of Anthropology.” In Small Places, Large Issues: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology (revsd 4th edition). London: Pluto: 12-31.
3 What is Culture? Culture and/versus Civilization Kottak, Conrad Phillip. 2015. “Culture” In Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity (16th edition). New York: McGraw Hill: 20-38. Kuper, Adam. 1999. “Culture and Civilization: French, German and English Intellectuals, 1930 – 1958.” In Culture: The Anthropologists’ Account. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press: 23-46.
4 Anthropology and Its Methods Singer, André (Director). 1986. Film: Off the Verandah (Strangers Abroad Series). 53 Minutes. Watch here. Malinowski, Bronislaw. 1922. “Introduction: Subject, Method and Scope of this Inquiry.” In Argonauts of the Western Pacific: An Account of Native Enterprise and Adventure in the Archipelagoes of Melanesian New Guinea. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul: 1-17. **Example of an Ethnography Ahmad, Irfan. “Injustice and the New World Order: An Anthropological Perspective on ‘Terrorism’ in India.” Critical Studies on Terrorism. 10 (1):115 –137.
5 Anthropological Theories: A Panoramic Account Kottak, Conrad Phillip. 2015. “Theory in Anthropology Over Time.” In Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity (16th edition). New York: McGraw Hill: 50-62. Ferraro, Gary and Susan Andretta. 2012. “The Growth of Anthropological Theories.” In Cultural Anthropology: An Applied Perspective. Stanford, CA: Cengage Learning: 73-90.
6 Modes of Living: Forms of Economy Over Time Kottak, Conrad Phillip. 2015. “Making A Living.” In Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity (16th edition). New York: McGraw Hill: 129-150. Eriksen, Thomas Hylland. 2015. “Exchange and Consumption.” In Small Places, Large Issues: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology (revsd 4th edition). London: Pluto: 217-240. Sahlins, Marshal. 2009. “Hunter-gatherers: Insights from a Golden Affluent Age.” Pacific Ecologist. Winter: 3-8.
7 Power & Origins of the State Ahmad, Irfan. 2018. “Is Political Anthropology Dead?” Anthropology News. February 26. 3 Pages. Lewellen, Ted C. 2003. “The Development of Political Anthropology”. In Political Anthropology: An Introduction. Westport, CT: Praeger: 1–14. Carneiro, Robert L. 1970. “A Theory of the Origin of the State.” Science 169 (3947): 733–738. Ahmad, Irfan. 2021. “A New Holistic Anthropology with Politics In.” In Anthropology and Ethnography Are Not Equivalent: Reorienting Anthropology for the Future, edited by Irfan Ahmad. New York: Berghahn: 112–40.
8 Gender & Age Eriksen, Thomas Hylland. 2015. “Gender and Age.” In Small Places, Large Issues: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology (revsd 4th edn.). London: Pluto: 155-175. Kottak, Conrad Phillip. 2015. “Gender.” In Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity (16th edition). New York: McGraw Hill: 174-193.
9 Race & Ethnicity Lieberman, Leonard, Blaine W. Stevenson and Larry T. Reynolds. 1997. “Race and Anthropology: A Core Concept Without Consensus.” Anthropology & Education Quarterly. 20 (2): 67–73. Kottak, Conrad Phillip. 2015. “Ethnicity and Race.” In Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity (16th edition). New York: McGraw Hill: 102-128. Eriksen, Thomas. 2015. “Ethnicity.” In Small Places, Large Issues: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology (revsd 4th edn.). London: Pluto: 329-344.
10 Fieldwork Trip
11 Family, Kinship & Marriage Kottak, Conrad Phillip. 2015. “Families, Kinship, and Descent.” In Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity (16th edition). New York: McGraw Hill: 194-211. Kottak, Conrad Phillip. 2015. “Marriage.” In Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity (16th edition). New York: McGraw Hill: 212-229.
12 Religion & Ritual Kottak, Conrad Phillip. 2015. “Religion.” In Cultural Anthropology: Appreciating Cultural Diversity (16th edition). New York: McGraw Hill: 231-249. Asad, Talal. “Anthropological Conceptions of Religion: Reflections on Geertz.” Man (new series) 18 (2): 237-259
13 Applied Anthropology; Public Anthropology Ferraro, Gary and Susan Andretta. 2012. “Applied Anthropology.” In Cultural Anthropology: An Applied Perspective. Stanford, CA: Cengage Learning: 51-70. Eriksen, Thomas. 2015. “Public Anthropology.” In Small Places, Large Issues: An Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology (revsd 4th edn.). London: Pluto: 391-400. Ahmad, Irfan et al. 2017. "Anthropological Publics, Public Anthropology: An AAA Annual Meeting Roundtable." Hau: Journal of Ethnographic Theory 7(1): 489-493.
14 No class


Contribution of Learning Outcomes to Programme Outcomes
P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7 P8 P9 P10 P11 P12 P13
All 4 4 5 4 5 4 4 5 5 4 5 4 3
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5

Contribution: 1: Very Slight 2:Slight 3:Moderate 4:Significant 5:Very Significant


https://obs.ihu.edu.tr/oibs/bologna/progCourseDetails.aspx?curCourse=210457&lang=en