Course Information
SemesterCourse Unit CodeCourse Unit TitleT+P+LCreditNumber of ECTS Credits
1SOC 101Introduction to Sociology3+0+035

Course Details
Language of Instruction English
Level of Course Unit Bachelor's Degree
Department / Program BA Program in Sociology
Mode of Delivery Face to Face
Type of Course Unit Compulsory
Objectives of the Course The course aims to:
• Familiarize the students with the “sociological perspective” on human behavior and society.
• Introduce the students to the rich intellectual heritage of sociology by outlining key sociological thinkers, concepts and ideas.
• Help the students grasp the heuristic value of the sociological concepts and theoretical frameworks.
• Initiate the students to using the “sociological imagination” to better understand social contexts, behaviors and phenomena.
Course Content This course aims to introduce undergraduate students a broad introduction to the discipline of sociology. Students are going to learn about essential concepts, theories, scholars, traditions and subfields of sociology. What is society and how can we understand it? What is the relation between individual and society? Who are the most influential thinkers who shaped the discipline? What are the core concepts and methodologies that have been used by sociologist in order to understand diverse social issues and problems in their own society, region and around the globe? What it means to ‘imagine’ and ‘think’ sociologically? These are some of the fundamental questions that are going to be responded during the lectures, in-class discussions and through presentations. This course will help students to develop their skills as critical thinkers for a deeper understanding of societies and cultures.
Course Methods and Techniques Readings, discussions, watching videos, CANVAS discussions.
Prerequisites and co-requisities None
Course Coordinator None
Name of Lecturers Instructor Dr. Tesnim Khriji
Assistants None
Work Placement(s) No

Recommended or Required Reading
Resources library and writing center
Students who participate in class discussions and who come to class prepared having read the weekly readings are expected to be successful in this class.
Timely submissions of assignments are also crucial for success. I suggest keeping up with assignments in order to avoid an overload of work at the end of the semester.
Learning Resources The core reading material required for the course is given below and available on CANVAS: Books and Articles: Peter L. Berger. Invitation to Sociology: A Humanistic Perspective (Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1963). C. Wright Mills. Sociological Imagination (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000). Zygmunt Bauman and Tim May. Thinking Sociologically (Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2019). Lisa J. McIntyre. The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology (Washington: McGraw Hill Educa
5
1 exam and 1 presentation

Course Category
Social Sciences %100

Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Activities are given in detail in the section of "Assessment Methods and Criteria" and "Workload Calculation"

Assessment Methods and Criteria
In-Term Studies Quantity Percentage
Mid-terms 1 % 20
Assignment 5 % 20
Practice 1 % 25
Project 1 % 30
Final examination 1 % 30
Total
9
% 125

 
ECTS Allocated Based on Student Workload
Activities Quantity Duration Total Work Load
Course Duration 14 3 42
Hours for off-the-c.r.stud 14 6 84
Assignments 5 2 10
Presentation 1 3 3
Mid-terms 1 4 4
Project 1 20 20
Total Work Load   Number of ECTS Credits 5 163

Course Learning Outcomes: Upon the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
NoLearning Outcomes
1 Compare general theories in contemporary sociology
2 Interpret and discuss current social issues on the basis of various theories and perspectives
3 Identify a variety of sociological perspectives, concepts and practices
4 Develop an understanding of sociological perspectives in a given society and make relevant comparisons


Weekly Detailed Course Contents
WeekTopicsStudy MaterialsMaterials
1 What is sociology? C. Wright Mills. “The Promise,” in The Sociological Imagination (New York: Oxford University Press, [1959] 2000), pp. 3-24.
2 Asking and Answering Sociological Questions, Theories and perspectives in sociology Lisa J. McIntyre (2014) Chapter 1 “Responding to Chaos: A Brief History of Sociology,” The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology (Washington: McGraw Hill Education, ), pp. 5-28.
3 The Sociological Eye Lisa J. McIntyre (2014) Chapter 2 “The Sociological Eye” and Chapter 3 “Science and Fuzzy Objects: Specialization in Sociology” The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology (Washington: Graw Hill Education) pp. 29-48
4 Culture and Society/ Social Interaction and Everyday life Lisa J. McIntyre (2014) Chapter “Culture,” in The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology (Washington: Graw Hill Education), pp.101-120. Anthony Giddens, Mitchell Duneier, Richard P. Appelbaum and Deborah Carr. (2017) “Chapter 2: Culture and Society”, Essentials of Sociology, Sixth Edition (New York: W. W. Norton & Company, INC.,), pp. 41-71 and 368-377.
5 Social Structure Lisa J. McIntyre. (2014) Chapter 8 “Social Structure”The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology (Washington: McGraw Hill Education,), pp.121-134
6 Society and Social Institutions Lisa J. McIntyre. (2014) Chapter 9 Society and Social Institution The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology (Washington: McGraw Hill Education,), pp. 136-150
7 Socialization and Family Lisa J. McIntyre. (2014) Chapter 10 “Socialization” The Practical Skeptic: Core Concepts in Sociology (Washington: McGraw Hill Education,), pp. 136-150
8 Stratification and Social Class Anthony Giddens, Mitchell Duneier, Richard P. Appelbaum and Deborah Carr. (2017) Chapter 8 “Stratification, class and Inequality”, Essentials of Sociology, Sixth edition (New York: W. W. Norton & Company, INC.)
9 Midterm Exam
10 Gender and Sexuality Anthony Giddens, Mitchell Duneier, Richard P. Appelbaum and Deborah Carr. (2017)“Chapter 9: Gender Inequality”, Essentials of Sociology, Sixth edition (New York: W. W. Norton & Company, INC., ), pp. 248-281. Ali Shariati. Fatima is Fatima. Translated by Laleh Bakhtiar (Tehran: The Shariati Foundation, 1980), pp. 64-111.
11 Crime and Deviance Anthony Giddens, Mitchell Duneier, Richard P. Appelbaum and Deborah Carr. (2017) Chapter 7 “ Conformity, Deviance and Crime :”, Essentials of Sociology, Sixth edition (New York: W. W. Norton & Company, INC.)
12 Government, Political Power and Social Movements Anthony Giddens, Mitchell Duneier, Richard P. Appelbaum and Deborah Carr. (2017) Chapter 13 “Government, Political Power, and Social Movements”, Essentials of Sociology, Sixth edition (New York: W. W. Norton & Company, INC.) pp.389-431
13 Work Graber, David Bullshit Jobs: A Theory (2018)Chapter One "What is a Bullshit Job.
14 Final / Or summing up


Contribution of Learning Outcomes to Programme Outcomes
P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 P7 P8 P9 P10 P11 P12 P13
C1 4 1 5 5
C2 5 2 3
C3 3 4
C4 4

Contribution: 1: Very Slight 2:Slight 3:Moderate 4:Significant 5:Very Significant


https://obs.ihu.edu.tr/oibs/bologna/progCourseDetails.aspx?curCourse=210445&lang=en